Word of the week #46: firefly

We’re back to the original format for “Word of the Week” posts. Once a week, I explore a word in different languages.

The word for this week is firefly, the little insect that lights up.

Chinese: 螢火蟲 [ㄧㄥˊ ㄏㄨㄛˇ ㄔㄨㄥˊ]
Japanese: 蛍 (ほたる) (hotaru)
Korean: 개똥벌레 (gae ttong beol le)
French: une luciole

Reminder: if you want to learn Chinese characters, visit the blog Learning Traditional Chinese Characters.

Word of the week #45: 火龍果

Dragon fruit has become popular in the U.S. lately. The Chinese characters for dragon fruit are 火龍果.

Dragon fruit seems to have taken over pomegranate as the next super food. Recently, at least two articles have been written about the recent surge in products containing dragon fruit: “Enter the Dragon Fruit” and “A Fruit With a Future.” Dragon fruit is not only in food products, but also home products like candles and air fresheners.


Source: Wikipedia

Word of the week #42: 蓮霧

For the longest time, I only knew the name of this fruit as 蓮霧 (lian wu). Actually I probably know this better as the Taiwanese pronunciation of lian bu. I remember eating this fruit in Taiwan. It’s one of my favorite fruits. Although the English name is wax apple, it tastes nothing like an apple. I don’t think I can compare it to another fruit. It’s crunchy, but it has a soft stringy texture. It is also really sweet.


Credit: Free images from acobox.com

Word of the week #41: 漿

Awhile ago, I remember reading that the dairy industry was opposed to the use of the word “milk” in “soy milk.” The argument from the dairy industry isn’t really adequate. But it did make me wonder why the word milk is used in English. I realized that there was no word like 漿 (jiang) in the English language. 漿 is for describing liquids that are thick. 豆漿 (dou jiang) is the word for soy milk.